OMS – Install Linux Agent on Windows 10 Bash

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Do you know these “WOW!” moments in an IT Pro’s life? Well I just had one of these moments recently when I heard about the Windows 10 Insider build feature where you can run Bash shell on Windows 10 as a dedicated subsystem. The description of the system is like this…

This isn’t a virtual machine, a container, or Linux software compiled for Windows (like Cygwin). Instead, Windows 10 gains a Linux Subsystem for Windows, which is based on Microsoft’s abandoned Project Astoria work for running Android apps on Windows. Think of it as the opposite of Wine. While Wine allows you to run Windows applications directly on Linux, the Linux Subsystem for Windows allows you to run Linux applications directly on Windows. (Source)

Microsoft co-operated with Canonical to offer a full Ubuntu-based Bash shell that runs atop this subsystem. Cool, now why is Microsoft doing this? Well, there was always an urge to have SSH on Windows for managing also any non-Windows system. I guess this is one reason and probably also for developers to develop scripts and utilities. We have an Ubuntu-based Bash shell, it is not a full blown Linux server (!), it is just a shell having tools installed and similar file structure as a Linux server but it does not have the Linux kernel deployed at all. Ok so what else can we do with it? I was wondering if the Linux OMS agent will run on that subsystem :). Sounds cool? Well, let’s see…

Bash Installation

The installation of Bash is pretty easy, install the latest Windows 10 Insider Preview build and make sure you update it immediately. In my environment it shows this version…

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Next enable Windows Subsystem for Linux (Beta) on the client…

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Restart the client and execute bash…

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Next, you need to provide user and password and then you should have your full blown Bash…

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It shows the following version…

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If you need very detailed steps, Scott Hanselmann has recorded a video with some more installation steps and also some additional information.

Next let’s install the OMS Linux agent…

OMS Linux Agent Installation

The installation of the agent is very well described on GitHub or I had also written a post some time ago. If you need detailed info, please check these articles first.

Download the agent using this command…

wget https://github.com/Microsoft/OMS-Agent-for-Linux
/releases/download/v1.1.0-217/omsagent-1.1.0-217.universal.x64.sh

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SCOM 2012 R2 TP3 – Monitoring Apache Web Server

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Few month ago, Microsoft released management packs for monitoring open source software like Apache HTTP Server or MySQL databases. In this post I would like to have an overview of monitoring Apache web server. So far there have not been many free options to actually monitor this web server, although it is a very common candidate out in the field. This management pack shows clearly Microsoft’s commitment to support open-source software in the SCOM world.

Support

This  current management pack supports version Apache HTTP Server version 2.2 and 2.4 if you install Apache from one of the SCOM supported Linux distributions. Find all supported *nix versions  here https://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/hh212713.aspx . In SUSE Linux Enterprise Server 11 there is Apache version 2.2 and in SUSE Linux Enterprise Server 12 there is Apache version 2.4 included. In this example I installed SUSE Enterprise Server 11 SP3.

The Apache management pack is part of the System Center 2016 Technical Preview 2 Management Packs for Open Source Software found here http://www.microsoft.com/en-us/download/details.aspx?id=46924 . Required is at least SCOM 2016 TP2, but SCOM TP2 has already expired few month ago, I will use SCOM 2016 TP3, which also works perfectly fine and can be found here https://technet.microsoft.com/en-gb/evalcenter/dn781241 .

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Microsoft Azure Operational Insights – Connecting Without SCOM

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I previously blogged about Microsoft Azure Operational Insights (MAOI). There are two ways you are able to connect to MAOI, first and best way 🙂 is using SCOM to connect using it’s built-in connector. Another and very easy way is to just install the Microsoft Monitoring Agent and connect this agent directly to MAOI. How this works?  I just want to show you here.

First create a Organizational Account or a Microsoft Account here  https://preview.opinsights.azure.com/ .

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SCOM 2012 R2 Technical Preview – A Box of Chocolates?

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I was asked few times during my engagements what has changed in the System Center Operations Manager Technical Preview. Microsoft released few weeks ago a first technical preview of Windows 10, Windows Server and System Center. You can download Windows 10 here , for Windows Server and System Center you need to have a MSDN subscription to download the sources or test it in Microsoft Azure. But what has changed in SCOM 2012 R2 Technical Preview? Is it like a box of chocolates, a box filled with many sweet things and surprises? Well, not really.

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Jalasoft – Xian SNMP Device Simulator V5

At some point in your SCOM career you need to have quick access to a network device because you either need to show the SCOM network monitoring capabilities, develop a SNMP management pack or you might need to build some custom SNMP monitors or rules. I think it is always a pain to carry a switch / router with me 🙂 or to get access in a customer environment. For such and more reasons, companies like Jalasoft created a SNMP Device Simulator.

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This May Jalasoft released version 5 of their software and I would like to give you a short overview of this clever and mature software.

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SCOM 2012 – SNMP Traps, How The Heck Do I Get It Working?

In this post I would like to share some know-how and my personal experience, because I have seen it so many times in the forums and other blogs which had trouble getting SNMP Traps working in SCOM 2012.

The difference between SCOM 2007 R2 and SCOM 2012 (R2) in terms of network monitoring is, that Microsoft rebuilt their SNMP stack for monitoring SNMP devices. Some advantages are, that we got sexy dashboards available with a lot of performance and availability data, a broad range of network device vendor support, a new RunAs account type for the community string to support SNMP V1, V2 and V3 credentials and so on. In addition to the features mentioned, Microsoft integrated a SNMP trap receiver right into SCOM and right there the confusion starts. I would like to show what it takes to get SNMP traps up and running.

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